Collecting Halloween With Mark Ledenbach Listen On Web Talk Radio (www.webtalkradio.net) or on iTunes


This week on The Collectors Show we meet Mark B. Ledenbach to talk about collecting Halloween. He is an extremely well respected collector and writer. Mark is the author of an incredibly informative and beautifully illustrated book called “Vintage Halloween Collectibles” now in its 3rd edition. Mark has been all over television including a segment on Martha Stewart Living, HGTV and all of the major print publications, and the owner of http://www.halloweencollector.com.

The trouble with collecting Halloween items is that so many of them were made to be used once and thrown out, which is exactly what most people did with them.

I was really happy to see some die-cut items in his collection that I had not seen

This was a die cut decoration from Beistle that was made in the 1930's. But I remember seeing it in elementary school back in the 1960's.

This was a die cut decoration from Beistle that was made in the 1930’s. But I remember seeing it in elementary school back in the 1960’s.

since elementary school.

This one in particular is a Beistle Die Cut cut out. It was supposed to have been made in 1930’s, while I was in elementary school in the 1960’s. So the ones I saw when I was a kid may have been knock-offs, but it was still fun to see again.

Things That Go Bump

This week’s bump music comes from the soundtrack of the television classic, “it’s the great pumpkin charlie brown” which first aired in 1966 when I was 7 years old! This music was also used in the Charlie Brown Christmas, but this music is played under the opening segment where Linus and Lucy find a pumpkin and bring it home to be made into a Jack O Lantern. You may be able to hear some of the action in the bumps. And while almost 50 years old, the music and the program still hold up.

Why I Like Halloween

Some of my best memories of being a kid were around Halloween. I did not grow up to be an astronaut, like I planned and rehearsed for every October 31, but it was still fun.

Did you get a rock?

Did you get a rock?

My sister and I went to at least two blocks near where we lived with some of our friends. It was safe to do that in those days. And like I said during the interview it was still OK to post Halloween decorations at school. We even sang Halloween songs. Halloween, like Christmas and Thanksgiving is an American celebration that borrows from the diverse heritage of all the people who live here.

Halloween is not strictly a set of traditions we took and grafted onto our culture. Instead we borrowed the parts we liked best and that we were most suited to and made them uniquely our own. It’s too bad for kids growing up today to miss out on that.

Next week, Legos and Will Reed from the web site Brick blogger to discuss a hobby that is completely out of control. Lego!

Collecting Halloween With Mark B. Ledenbach


Vintage Halloween Collectibles is now in its 3rd edition.  The writer, Mark B. Ledenbach is the guest on The Collectors Show this week.

Vintage Halloween Collectibles is now in its 3rd edition. The writer, Mark B. Ledenbach is the guest on The Collectors Show this week.

This week on The Collectors Show we meet Mark B. Ledenbach. He is an extremely well respected collector and writer. Mark is the author of an incredibly informative and beautifully illustrated book called “Vintage Halloween Collectibles” now in its 3rd edition. Listen here: http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2014/10/20/the-collectors-show-2/

He has been all over television including a segment on Martha Stewart Living, HGTV and all of the major print publications, and the owner of http://www.halloweencollector.com. In the news segment we learn about two significant crimes that were committed against collectors.

To see all of the news be sure to visit http://www.collectorsshow.net. And send comments and suggestions to me at haroldnicoll@gmail.com.

Couple Sues Arizona Art Gallery Over Sold Warhol


Couple Sues Arizona Art Gallery Over Sold Warhol.

Couple Sues Arizona Art Gallery Over Sold Warhol


A couple says a Scottsdale art gallery that was storing their Andy Warhol work sold it without their permission. The painting was called The Red Shoes.

Andy Warhol and The Red Shoes.

Andy Warhol and The Red Shoes.

Amy Koler and Stephen Meyer sued American Fine Art Editions, Phillip Koss, Jacqueline Carroll, and Jeff Dippold in Maricopa County Court, alleging conversion and breach of fiduciary duty. The couple had moved out of state and kept Warhol’s “Red Shoes” in storage at the gallery.

Koler and Meyer say they bought the Warhol from American Fine Art Editions in 2005 for $65,000. They were offered that same price by the gallery as reimbursement for the sale, but maintain that the Warhol is worth much more now.

Read more at Courthouse News

Owner of the most famous stamp ever may not know it was stolen


You’ve probably heard or seen the “Inverted Jenny” stamp. Even people who do not collect stamps know about the stamp with the upside down airplaine. We learn from Antique Trader (www.antiquetrader.com) magazine that one of the two of these was stolen!

The inverted jenny stamp. If you have one it may be stolen!

The inverted jenny stamp. If you have one it may be stolen!

A reward of up to $100,000 is being offered to locate two of the world’s most famous rare postage stamps that are still missing after they were stolen from the exhibit of a wealthy New York City woman in Virginia nearly 60 years ago. They were part of an intact block of four stamps from the fabled sheet of 100 “Inverted Jenny” airmail stamps mistakenly printed in 1918 with an upside down image of a Curtis Jenny airplane.

“It’s possible that the two remaining missing stamps were innocently acquired by collectors decades ago who did not realize they had been stolen. With the passage of time, the heirs of those collectors may not realize they’ve inherited stolen property,” said Donald Sundman, President of Mystic Stamp Company in Camden, New York. Sundman is offering the reward of $50,000 per stamp on behalf of their current, legal owners, the American Philatelic Research Library in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania.

He made the reward announcement, Saturday, September 13, 2014, at Aerophilately 2014, an annual convention of airmail stamp collectors held at the American Philatelic Society headquarters in Bellefonte.

For 19 years the stamps were the prize possession of Ethel B. McCoy (1893 – 1980), a patron of performing arts and an avid collector whose father, Charles Bergstresser, was a co-founder of the Dow Jones company.

She acquired the block of four Inverted Jenny 24-cent denomination airmail stamps for $16,000 in 1936, and it was stolen in September 1955 while on exhibit at the American Philatelic Society convention in Norfolk, Virginia. The block was broken apart, and one of the stolen stamps was discovered in 1977, another in 1981. Both were recovered with the participation of the FBI. Only 100 of the legendary Inverted Jenny stamps were ever reported, all coming from a single sheet purchased in 1918 at a Washington, D.C. Post Office by William T. Robey for their combined face value, $24. In short order, the sheet changed hands and it was broken apart, sometimes as single stamps, sometimes as blocks.

“Many people who have never licked a stamp hinge know about the Post Office printing error that produced an inverted biplane on a 24¢ airmail stamp in 1918. To them it is ‘the

Before she died at the age of 87 in 1980, McCoy donated both of them along with the legal rights to the two still missing stamps to the American Philatelic Research Library.

McCoy’s first husband, Bert A. Stewart, a coin collector, died in 1936. In 1941 she married a prominent stamp collector, Walter R. McCoy, and they were active in philatelic organizations. In 1937 she was named a director of the American Air Mail Society and was posthumously named to the American Philatelic Society Hall of Fame in 1981.

Only 100 of the legendary Inverted Jenny stamps were ever reported, all coming from a single sheet purchased in 1918 at a Washington, D.C. Post Office by William T. Robey for their combined face value, $24. In short order, the sheet changed hands and it was broken apart, sometimes as single stamps, sometimes as blocks.

“Many people who have never licked a stamp hinge know about the Post Office printing error that produced an inverted biplane on a 24¢ airmail stamp in 1918. To them it is ‘the upside-down airmail stamp’ and immediately recognizable as a symbol of stamp collecting,” said Rob Haeseler, Chairman of the American Philatelic Research Library’s McCoy Reward Committee.

In 2005, Sundman traded one of the two known 1868 Ben Franklin one-cent denomination “Z Grill” postage stamps for the unique, numbered plate block of four Inverted Jenny stamps then owned by Wall Street bonds trader Bill Gross. The exchange was valued at $6 million at the time.

The reward offer for the missing McCoy stamps is being made by Sundman for one year, through September 2015. Anyone with information about the missing stamps can contact the American Philatelic Society at 800-782-9580 extension 246 or by email at Jenny@stamps.org.

- See more at: http://www.antiquetrader.com/antiques/collectibles/philatelic-society-offering-100000-reward-return-stolen-rare-stamps#sthash.p4pYQQB0.dpuf

 

 

The Collectors Show Reaches 3,000 Downloads!


OK, it was really only 2,979 downloads for The Collectors Show for the week of October 6, 2014. But that’s still a lot!

The Admiral Akbarf bag made available for queasy riders at the Star Tours ride at Disneyland.

The Admiral Akbarf bag made available for queasy riders at the Star Tours ride at Disneyland.

This was our show about collecting barf bags.

And in case you missed it you can still listen by going here:

http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2014/10/06/the-collectors-show-collecting-barf-bags/

This Week On The Collectors Show The Cold War and Area 51


This week on The Collectors Show we talk about collecting artifacts from The Cold War and Area 51 with Karen Green.

Karen is the Senior Curator and Director of Exhibits at the National Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada. The National Atomic Testing Museum is a repository for one of the most comprehensive collections of nuclear history. As part of its mission, the National Atomic Testing Museum seeks to collect and preserve a wide variety of materials and artifacts relating to atomic testing, the Nevada Test Site, the Cold War, and nuclear and radiological science and technology. The current collection includes thousands of rare photographs, videos, artifacts, scientific and nuclear reports and data and one-of-a kind scientist collections.

We also hear news about what celebrities like Angelina Jolie collect (it’s knives and daggers).

To listen to The Collectors Show visit http://www.webtalkradio.net or iTunes.